curator picks

We are one of only 25 exhibitors invited to participate in Sight Unseen OFFSITE, a cutting-edge cultural event that connects forward-thinking brands with the best independent design studios. On view is something completely new: Twyla art in virtual reality.

Sight Unseen’s editors curated our art based on their top interior design trends for 2017, and visitors can experience it inside seven unique virtual reality spaces created by up-and-coming designer, and newest Twyla artist, Tom Hancocks.

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The pieces on these walls are by artists Winston Chmielinski and Yorgos Stamkopoulos, both based in Berlin. Winston's artwork (left) follows the "Classical Remix" trend as identified by Sight Unseen. This trend's virtual environment includes an eclectic mix of ultra-contemporary pieces with classical ones, like Persian rugs, oil paintings, and ornate wooden armoires.

In a complete 180, the "80s Japan" space that incorporates Yorgos's artwork features sleek spaces and a neon glow, plus gives a nod to the groundbreaking furniture of Shiro Kuramata, whose pieces are having a huge influence on contemporary furniture now.

Trend: Classical Remix.
Trend: Classical Remix.
Trend: 80s Japan.
Trend: 80s Japan.
Hardest Water by Winston Chmielinski.
Untitled #001 by Yorgos Stamkopoulos.

The works on the far back wall are by artists Tom Hancocks and Esmeralda Kosmatopoulos. Both explore technology in their work. Tom, who is also the designer behind the VR environments featured in our OFFSITE booth, creates stylishly avant-garde spaces and objects that exist solely in the digital realm. His art is featured in the "Global Minimalism" room, which shows a mash-up of light and airy furniture and rustic, craft-inspired details.

Esmeralda's work, on the other hand (see what we did, there?), questions the rampant use of technology in society. Her prints depict hands cast in plaster while swiping through smart phones. They fit perfectly in the room dubbed "Mies 2.0," which showcases minimalist sculpture, modern furniture and huge windows, a la the Barcelona Pavilion.

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Trend: Global Minimalism.
Trend: Global Minimalism.
Trend: Mies 2.0.
Trend: Mies 2.0.
Rock by Tom Hancocks.
Vase by Tom Hancocks.
Hand 1 by Esmeralda Kosmatopoulos.
Hand 2 by Esmeralda Kosmatopoulos.
Hand 3 by Esmeralda Kosmatopoulos.
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Twyla artist, Tim Biskup, uses his background in graphic design and illustration to create bold compositions that are technically complex studies of color, subject matter, and design theory. We think his art pairs perfectly with the "70s Chic" trend; 70s leather sofas are a massive trend right now — especially anything by Percival Laufer or De Sede, and especially when paired with Lucite or glass furniture and tons of plants.

Trend: 70s Chic.
Trend: 70s Chic.
Memory Construction #1 by Tim Biksup.
Memory Construction #2 by Tim Biskup.

Twyla artists, Carolanna Parlato and Anne Senstad, are both featured on this wall, and though they look seamless together, these pieces fit into different trends. Carolanna's work is highlighted in the "Muted Scandi Pastel" room. Pastel colors are everywhere in interiors, particularly paired with pale, sleek wood. On the opposite of the color spectrum is the "Color Blocking" trend, often featuring bright and bold colored walls.

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Trend: Muted Scandi Pastels.
Trend: Muted Scandi Pastels.
Trend: Color Blocking.
Trend: Color Blocking.
Grounding by Carolanna Parlato.
Colour Kinesthesia Blue by Anne Senstad.
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